Temperature and Superconductivity

Everything about Robert Distinti's Ethereal Mechanics, New Electromagnetism theories and Q-Vector Algebra.
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Walter Verbrugggen
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Temperature and Superconductivity

Post by Walter Verbrugggen » Fri May 09, 2014 8:11 am

Is there a relation between temperature and consumption/acceleration of the ether?

Approaching the Absolute Zero temperature, the common knowledge is the atomic movement ceases. Ideal gasses to a volume of 0.

If ether is the driving force of this atomic movement, the consumption/acceleration of ether to the atoms has to change.
Since the acceleration of the ether can be linked to gravity, and mass is related to gravity...

A logical conclusion could be that colder matter weights less than hot matter?
This contradicts the common knowledge...
Hot matter weights less, cfr. gasses, metals...,
(the rise in volume result in a lower volumetric weight)

When we compare this to Distinti's BMP, Lower temperature could mean a smaller radius between charges,
A higher temperature could mean a bigger radius between the charges.
Since the radius doesn't affect the stability of the BMP (p27 of ne2.pdf), and the energy of the system depends on radius,
There could be another conclusion.
Variation in consumption of the ether can result in a variation in radius of the BMP and a variation in total energy of the system.
A bigger radius will result in less mass.

So how do we deal with super conductance?
If the radius of electron and proton don't change in the same rate, will there be a moment were the protons are the "moving" charges?
Does the radius of the positive charges mirrors the magnetic field?

Please comment on this...

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Distinti
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Re: Temperature and Superconductivity

Post by Distinti » Fri May 09, 2014 6:18 pm

Excellent Question
Heat is thermally induced vibration of material structures ("thermal noise" is appropriate EE term)

In some materials, heat reduces the conductivity of a material in an analogous manner to which high ocean waves makes a sea voyage more difficult.

In other materials (such as semiconductors) heat increases conductivity in an analogous manner to which vibrating sand suffers liquefaction causing objects to sink more readily.

Cessation of thermal noise through super cooling does not mean normal material processes stop, pretons still have to feed.

(We will cover more on how pretons feed when the second Pretonic gateway is released which depends upon the new math construct)

Ether consumption to support normal material processes far eclipses the additional consumption required to support object stresses (thermal noise, load bearing, etc). the number will make sense when you see them.

Yes a very hot object will consume a slight bit more ether and so its gravitational field will ever so slightly increase; however, its average inertia remains the same (though it is modulated by the thermal noise)

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Walter Verbrugggen
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Re: Temperature and Superconductivity

Post by Walter Verbrugggen » Mon May 12, 2014 5:59 am

If heat is a thermally induced vibration, so how can it be induced?
When focusing on a hydrogen atom, or the BMP according the NE buildup.
The ether is providing the energy for the system. If heat is an induced vibration, and the only factor providing energy to this system (hydrogen atom) is the ether, than heat should be treated as a vibration of the ether.
This can also mean the mass (inertia) should not be treated as a constant, but more as a average in a fluctuation of the ether (or supply of ethons and pretons).
I've made a graph of it (using scilab...)
...
Image

Or when we have a system where the radius of the vibration is bigger than the radius of a "cold" system...
Image

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Walter Verbrugggen
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Re: Temperature and Superconductivity

Post by Walter Verbrugggen » Mon May 12, 2014 10:29 am

When calculating the radius an electron should have, with the elementary charge and weight of an electron. And continuing the same way of thinking, I came to something really remarkable.

The two charges of an electron should be half the charge ( 1.60217657×10-19 C / 2), the mass of an electron is 9.109386 x10-31 kg. The calculated expected radius to provide the mass is
7,04484847E-16 the measured radius is 2,817941E-15. ( a factor 4)

If we consider that the measured radius has to be the expected radius plus a vibrating radius…
the measured radius minus the measured radius will give the radius due to vibration. (Is this thermal???)
This calculated factor is 3. (because 3+1=4) ;-)

Here is an impression of this ratio.

Image

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SebastianG
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Re: Temperature and Superconductivity

Post by SebastianG » Mon May 12, 2014 1:38 pm

Nice graphs!
I tried once to simulate a hydrogen atom and my electrons either crash into the nucleus or just fly away.

I think you are right that heat is the vibration of ether. Light and Heat are electromagnetic waves, they just have different frequencies.

This is just conjecture:
Because the electron consumes ether it should "ride" on the waves of the ether. Also the vibration of an electron should let the ether vibrate.
Is there a resonance frequency between the ether and electrons? Just like a spring and a mass has a natural frequency?

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Walter Verbrugggen
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Re: Temperature and Superconductivity

Post by Walter Verbrugggen » Mon May 12, 2014 2:42 pm

This is only a graphical representation of a possible vibration:
not a simulation of hydrogen. Sorry I'm not that good....
Here a little explanation of the function,

Rp = the radius of the system cfr Distinti's BMP
Rd = a dynamical radius,
n= some value, to make it look nice....
x = (Rp +Rd*cos(n*a))* cos(a)
y = (Rp +Rd*cos(n*a))* sin(a)
z = Rd sin(a)

Making Rd 3 times bigger than Rp has result a possible explanation of why the mass of the electron didn't correspond to the actual radius...
Probably the dynamic vibration could be a resonance state of the ether (I presume, but since this is a thought experiment it also could be totally different :D )

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SebastianG
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Re: Temperature and Superconductivity

Post by SebastianG » Thu May 22, 2014 1:38 pm

I would really like to know how the vibrations will look like. But I guess we have to wait till the new math framework is out and we keep crossing the gateway to the Pretonic field equations.

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